Witch Seeks Employment: Cover letter

Dear Future Employer,

I humbly submit my application for the advertised position, as I believe that I am uniquely qualified. I’ve been known to spin straw into gold, but only when the blue moon is on a Tuesday in a leap year when mars is conjunct my natal sun.  I fart rainbows, sweat sunshine and can fly.

I’m a kindler of infectious enthusiasm, and pied piper of inner-children, whimsy and cheer. My smile once launched a thousand ships, unfortunately; they were all smashed on the rocks of foolish idealism. Though all was lost, they died happy and singing my praises to the tune of “100 bottles of beer on the wall.”

Due to the God Pluto once losing to me in a game of gin rummy, I can have enlightenment or material riches, but not both. I may not have made the right choice. Thus, my application for this position.

I am on a first name basis with the elephant in this room. He’s agreed to be my character reference, but he is very judgmental, so I don’t like him much.

My fastest speed for changing from executive power suit to superhero suit in a phone booth is half the time it takes to actually find a phone booth. I once resolved a hostage crises using nothing but my smartphone, while grocery shopping with a toddler and a baby, and still saved $24.99 with coupons.

With only my own body and holistic living I created two entirely new human beings, then fed them for free for a year. They were so cute they both won blue ribbons at the state fair.

I have skills so fearsome that they require special permission by city council to practice in this county. I can travel to anywhere in time and space and never leave the room. And yet, have not divined how best to trade these skills to make a mortgage payment.

With this minimum wage position, I know that together we can take over the world, but in a loving, egalitarian way, of course.

Thank you for your consideration,

Heron Michelle

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Heron Holds the Moon ~ Photo by Lauren, used with permission

Witch on Fire: Witchcraft without Superstition

Lots of folks enter into Witchcraft through the door marked “spell work.” Need is both a universally human thing and a highly motivational thing. Necessity is the mother of invention, as they say, and when you hold a dire need that seems impossible, average folks become willing to venture into the unknown for what they think of as supernatural assistance.

Just about anyone can “do a spell” and follow the directions in a technical manual to relative success. That tends to be the hook; you do the thing, it works crazy fast, JUST LIKE MAGIC, and suddenly you don’t think this Witchcraft thing sounds so farfetched anymore. Hello line, hello sinker.

Newcomers to the Craft may be approaching spell workings from a superstitious perspective; unfortunately, some folks never grow beyond that phase. They don’t yet know WHY these things are done, just “that’s just how granny always did it,” or “that’s what the spell book told me to do.” If they stop there and never pursue the academic understanding part, the occult lore behind the spell can be lost, and it is reduced to dogma.

Everyone works magick on some level when they make a wish and blow out the birthday candles, or pray for some change in their lives and it comes to pass. However, a magus knows WHY these techniques work; they have both the knowledge of what to do and a relationship with the ingredients. Magi can back up their magick to write their OWN technical manual, improve it, engineer an even more kick-ass Spell 2.0. They are artists who climb out of the traditional box, and enhance both their life and the Craft effectively.

Fantasmic Evil Queen Casting a spell

By HarshLight [CC BY 2.0] via Wikimedia Commons

Superstition versus Empowerment

You should know, dear reader, I make no room in my witchcraft for superstition and I hope you won’t either. Either know why it works, what quality the ingredient can and should bring to the work, or don’t do it. Much of spell work is a kind of theater of poetry, but if you don’t know what the metaphors mean, you cannot enact them accurately. Not that we can’t hold some “faith” in what is currently ineffable, but the difference between “magick” and “superstition” is fear and ignorance, both binding of our power.  Consider this definition from Merriam-Webster Dictionary:

Superstition: noun
•    a belief or way of behaving that is based on fear of the unknown and faith in magic or luck.
•    a belief or practice resulting from ignorance, fear of the unknown, trust in magic or chance, or a false conception of causation.
•    an irrational abject attitude of mind toward the supernatural, nature, or God resulting from superstition.
•    a notion maintained despite evidence to the contrary.

I know full well that there are whole systems of magick designed to draw on fear and utilize coercion of the “supernatural,” but this definition doesn’t describe my practice at all. I understand the causation at play, I am not afraid, I know things, and I hold no concept of  the Supernatural, because nothing can be outside of nature when you are a panentheist. Moreover, I have a lifetime of evidence in my support.

My magick might involve the unseen dimensions and a non-incarnate being or two, but these are places I’ve been, beings I know, and I have a damned good idea why it works.  If the spell I’m doing isn’t empowering me, and freeing me from fear, ignorance and an “irrational abject attitude,” why would I bother to do it? Mama Heron don’t mess about.

To continue reading this article at its home on Witch on Fire, click here!

 

Witch on Fire: “Money Pot” Spell for the Harvest Season

[Originally posted at my patheos.com blog, Witch on Fire]
During this harvest season, I would like to share with you a “Money Pot” spell, that brings wealth and abundance into our lives.

While Southern Conjure is a form of folk magick that I have the most yet to discover, I’ve found over the years that these traditional spells are some of the most creative, and yet down-to-earth spells, you can enact. I appreciate this form of folk magick that is so inherently tied to this “neck of the woods” where I’m from. For me, they work like a charm!

The idea of a “Money Pot” was first introduced to me by Orion Foxwood (1), when he taught workshops here at our local Samhain festival in 2012. Later, I was privileged to work with him further at an intensive training weekend, where he took us into deeper detail about the culture of Appalachian Conjure and Root Work techniques. Now, I make good use of these techniques in just about every magickal working I do.

Heron's "Money Pot" spell--a work in progress over 4 years. Photo by Heron Michelle

Heron’s “Money Pot” spell–a work in progress over 4 years. Photo by Heron Michelle

My money pot has now been a part of my altar for 4 years, and through meandering trial, error, and research it has grown to become a reflection of my unique path and relationship with the Powers. A money pot, like a mojo hand, or any other talisman one nurtures over time, becomes radically personal, and should not be touched or tampered with by anyone other than it’s owner.

I encourage you to “field test” this experiment for yourselves. Start with the basic recipe, but get to know each player for yourself. Feel it, develop a relationship with each spark of consciousness within, and know exactly which powers you are awakening and calling to your aid. Then trust your guts as you evolve the working over time for your own needs. I’m an eclectic, so I have no problem blending what I know from across traditions, so long as I approach both the Spirit within, and the culture, with knowledge and respect. You do what feels right for you.

Click here to continue over to Witch on Fire for the complete directions.

Witch on Fire: Lammas Corn Salsa over Cheesy Tomato Polenta

[Originally posted at my Patheos Blog, Witch on Fire]

Just for some fun witchin’ in the kitchen this Lammastide, here are a few of my favorite recipes that take great advantage of the summer garden abundance of tomatoes and peppers, and will thrill your coven-mates this Sabbat feast. It’s easy to make ahead of time, is even more delicious the second day, and is simple to transport for picnics and pot-lucks. YUMMO!

Salsa and Polenta Fixin's ~ Photo by Heron Michelle

Lammas Black Bean and Corn Salsa

Vegan, Raw, Gluten Free
Ingredients:
1 can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 can corn, drained. Or about two cups of fresh corn that has been roasted, then cut off of the cob.
1 large tomato, diced
1 green bell pepper, seeded and diced
1/3 cup fresh chopped cilantro
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon maple syrup or agave nectar
2 teaspoons chili powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1 1/2 tablespoon Bragg’s Liquid Aminos (or sea salt to taste)
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Mix it all up and let it marinate for an hour or so. Taste it, and tweak the seasonings according to your own preferences. Sometimes I add more salt for a deeper base note, or more lemon for extra brightness. If it needs more richness, add olive oil. If you want some heat, add a smidge of cayenne or red pepper.

At this point you can serve at room temperature with tortilla corn chips. Or, you can keep going, and make some cheesy tomato polenta, and top with this salsa for a tasty vegetarian meal!

Lammas Salsa over Polenta ~ Photo by Heron Michelle

Click here to continue over to Witch on Fire for the Cheesy Tomato Polenta Recipe

Witch on Fire: Lammas Cocktails for High Summer

[This entire post can be found at my Patheos.com blog, Witch on Fire. I invite you to subscribe to my blog there and always be the first to receive the latest articles.]

Lammastides are flowing in, beloveds! The Sabbat of High Summer, the midpoint of the season of growth and fruition, comes in HOT, wet, and delicious here in North Carolina. That sounds like a party to me! We celebrate this peak of juicy, glorious summer when we reach 15 degrees of Leo on our lap around Papa Sun, which happens to fall on August 7th this year (2016.)

This week I’m heading out on vacation with my Sweetheart, as I journey to Colorado for hiking, camping and relaxing around that state’s wondrous hot springs. Which reminds me, Lammas is a great time to enjoy a cold refreshing cocktail with your loved ones! Bring a pitcher of these to the Sabbat picnic, and they’ll love you for it!

2 classes of Lammas Lovers Lemonade with twisty straws

Lammas Lemonade for Two!

Lammas Lemonade

Cocktails are basically “potions” if you awaken and charge them for an intent. This alcoholic beverage may look like a dirty mojito, but if you give it a job to do, besides get you drunk, its also a great chalice brew.

The peppermint and lemon are both prized for their benefits of purification and love, healing and friendship. Peppermint is traditionally associated with the powers of Air, and Lemon with the powers of water. I say call on BOTH elements to cool us off, while bringing us together. Plus, everyone knows that a good, Spiced Rum is the nectar of the gods, and a great choice for making offerings.

It’s summer time and “all acts of love and pleasure are my rituals.(1)” I don’t know about y’all, but I like my cocktails like I like my lovers: sweet, dirty, and strong. Boom chica wowow!

Click here for the recipe at Witch on Fire!